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    The latest AJAD issue, Vol. 16 No. 1, contains seven articles and one book review that delves into the following: Bhutan’s gross national happiness concept at the farm level; the Malaysian rice self-sufficiency policy; constraints in Myanmar’s Ayeyarwaddy region rice value chain; interlinkages in Vietnamese agro supply chains; adaptation of rice farming to slow-onset hazards in the Philippines; lessons in adaptive capacities in upland farming; youth involvement in agriculture in the Philippines; and a review of a book on sustainable intensification of agriculture. Read More
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About AJAD

The Asian Journal of Agriculture and Development (AJAD), an international refereed journal, provides information and analysis on topics within the broad scope of agriculture and development. It publishes articles resulting from empirical, policy-oriented, or institutional development studies, as well as articles of perspectives on agriculture and development; political economy of rural development; and trade issues.

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Meet AJAD's Editorial Board headed by Dr. Cielito F. Habito, Professor of Economics at the Ateneo de Manila University and former Socioeconomic Planning Secretary and Director General of the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) of the Philippines.


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Previous Articles

Ensuring Food Security – A Case for ASEAN Integration

The ASEAN member countries can be grouped into three sub-groups, each of which exhibits a distinct pattern with respect to food security issues. The first group is made up of the relatively food-secure countries of Singapore and Brunei. The second group consists of Malaysia, Thailand, Philippines, Indonesia, and Vietnam. In these countries, except for Vietnam, agriculture has contributed a declining share in GDP, employment, and international trade. In addition, food habits in these countries have changed dramatically in recent decades. The third group is composed of Cambodia, Lao PDR, and Myanmar—economies in transition that require special attention.

A simple exercise shows that the area can collectively achieve food security via trade in rice and maize. Trade facilitation measures and the harmonization/equivalency of food regulation and control standards will reduce the cost of trade in food products. While specialization and revealed comparative and competitive indices point to complementarities between trade patterns among the ASEAN member countries, intra-ASEAN trade in agriculture is quite small. However, integration could address this problem. Further, if integration is to be used as a venue for ensuring food security, the member countries must agree on what food security collectively means to them, and what food items are important to each of them and the region, in general, so that regional integration and cooperation under the auspices of ASEAN can be promoted.

Vol. 2 No. 1&2, December 2005

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